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November 21st, 2011

National Psoriasis Awareness Campaign, Are You Serious?, Launches New Online Community

From Craig Stoltz, Director, Product Communication, Immunology, Janssen Biotech, Inc.

Last November, I posted about the launch of a national awareness campaign for people living with plaque psoriasis, called Are You Serious?TM, which you may remember featured renowned comedian Jon Lovitz. Inspired by finding a treatment that worked for him after living with psoriasis for nearly a decade, Lovitz told his psoriasis story and infused his unique style of humor into Are You Serious?TM to illustrate the everyday impact of this disease, while reinforcing the importance of having open and frank discussions with a dermatologist. 

A year later, my colleagues and I are still working on raising awareness for people with plaque psoriasis, which is the most prevalent autoimmune disease in the United States.  This year, we are shifting the Are You Serious?TM spotlight to the millions of Americans living with plaque psoriasis  — so they can share the moments that motivated them to get serious about psoriasis. Buy Kamagra Oral Jelly online 100mg Sildenafil Citrate We hope that this expansion of the conversation will give people an outlet to talk about what led them to work with a dermatologist towards effectively managing their symptoms, and will motivate others to do the same. 

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November 11th, 2011

A Veteran’s Day Reflection on Mental Health

From Bill Weldon, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Johnson & Johnson

Each Veterans Day, Americans take a collective pause to express our gratitude for those who so honorably serve in the Armed Forces. We say a silent thank you for all who sacrificed their lives in the cause of freedom, and applaud the heroism and bravery of returning veterans whose visible wounds often bear witness to their time on the front lines. But this Veterans Day, many of our young men and women in uniform are struggling with less visible wounds: traumatic injuries that don’t require a prosthetic or wheelchair – yet leave deep and lasting scars on the mind.

The challenge of treating and curing diseases and injuries to the brain is more critical than ever.  After nine years of frequent deployments, today’s combat veterans are increasingly suffering not only traumatic brain injuries but also the emotional and psychological wounds of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental conditions including addiction, depression and suicide. A 2011 study of returning soldiers conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse found that one in five active duty and more than four in ten reserve soldiers had been diagnosed as needing mental health treatment.

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November 10th, 2011

Remembering Our Veterans

From Russell Clayton, Sourcing Manager—PLDP, Johnson & Johnson World Headquarters, Co-Chair, Veterans Leadership Council

Veterans Day holds a special place in my heart. For nine years, I served as a Captain in the United States Army, Corps of Engineers and participated in Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003.The diverse experiences I’ve had in the military have played a tremendous role in my life both personally and professionally. In the military, Order Cheapest Kamagra soft 100mg Without Prescription Sildenafil Citrate I learned not only about the value of discipline and teamwork in reaching a common goal, but also how to lead others. Today, as the co-chair of the Veterans Leadership Council (VLC), one of our affinity groups here at Johnson & Johnson, I can also say with great pride that Johnson & Johnson has a long legacy of serving and empowering its many employees who have served, and continue to serve in the military.

Johnson & Johnson employees volunteering through military service is a tradition that began in 1898 with the Spanish American War when two employees in the U.S. volunteered to serve in the military. One of those employees had just been hired at the Company, but felt it was his patriotic duty to serve his country, which the Company supported fully–even paying the employee’s salary while he served (today the Company pays the difference between the J&J and military salary).

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November 10th, 2011

Health and Economic Growth at APEC

From Clifford Holland, Corporate Vice President, Government Affairs and Public Policy, Johnson & Johnson

Today I begin my first day at the 2011 Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) CEO Summit, which brings together more than 1,500 business and government leaders from the 21 APEC member economies.  The purpose of the summit is to facilitate economic cooperation and the development of frameworks for trade, investment and regulatory policy in the region. In this global economic climate, there is a sense of urgency as leaders from the APEC countries convene to discuss prospects for recovery and long-term sustainable economic growth. Collaboration among the APEC economies is vital to creating the business environments that fuel growth and innovation. I know that at Johnson & Johnson we share the concerns of these leaders, and look forward to working together to seek solutions.

This week’s meetings will, of course, focus on policies more conducive to business investment, such as those that reduce barriers to trade and level the competitive playing field. However, it is important to note that development in the APEC economies is also tightly linked to the state of a nation’s health, or more specifically, its people’s health

Restoring and sustaining growth requires policies that recognize the role of health care as the largest sector of the global – and APEC – economies, and a prime driver of growth.

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November 9th, 2011

Shedding Light on Driving in the Dark

From Gary Esterow, Senior Director, Public Relations, VISTAKON® Division of Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc.

On November 6, we turned our clocks back an hour in the United States. For those of us who drive, the end of Daylight Savings Time means more time driving in the dark.

We may not be conscious of it, but when we are behind the wheel, our eyes are constantly on the move – looking at cars ahead and to the side, reading traffic signs, and checking the rearview mirror.  Then our eyes shift to objects a bit closer such as the speedometer, global navigation system and the radio. When it’s dark, these tasks can become much more difficult for some drivers.

As I’ve gotten older, I’ve noticed little changes when I am driving in low-light conditions.  I notice that glare from headlights seems to bother me a bit more and I just get this feeling that my vision could be a bit sharper. I recently went for my annual eye exam and discussed this with my optometrist. A comprehensive eye exam confirmed that my eyes were healthy.  After he checked my vision, we agreed to try a slight change in my contact lens prescription to improve my distance vision.

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November 7th, 2011

Addressing Stroke Risk in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

By Peter M. DiBattiste, M.D., Global Therapeutic Area Head, Cardiovascular and Metabolism, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C.

As a cardiologist and music lover, the heart’s constant and rhythmic beat has always been a passion of mine. I’m fascinated by the way that it speeds up when a person is exercising or excited, and the way it slows down during periods of rest.

Sometimes, though, the heart does not contract the way that it should. The beat can become very fast and irregular, in a condition known as atrial fibrillation. This is the most common cardiac rhythm disorder, affecting more than 2.2 million people in the United States, and may leave patients feeling weak, faint, and short of breath. Some patients may not feel any symptoms at all. The irregular heartbeat also leaves people with atrial fibrillation vulnerable to forming blood clots in the heart’s atria, which can potentially travel to the brain, resulting in a stroke.  

Patients with atrial fibrillation are at a five-fold increased risk for stroke compared with the general population. Recommended treatments are available to help reduce this risk of stroke, including medications that thin the blood to help prevent the formation of clots. Despite these recommendations, studies show that nearly half of patients with this condition do not receive appropriate medication.This is important to think about, because the results of stroke are potentially devastating, and take a serious physical, emotional, and financial toll on both the patients and their families.

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July 28th, 2011

Why Becoming A Member of the BDR Matters

From Ruben Taborda, Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer, Medical Devices & Diagnostics group, Johnson & Johnson

I am often asked to explain what drives our commitment to supplier diversity. My answer is usually the same—enhancing our supplier network supports job creation in our communities and connects us to the patients and doctors we serve. This simple response explains why we are so determined to become leaders in this space. Although there is no true end goal (we can always get better at what we do), I believe our recent membership into the Billion Dollar Roundtable (BDR) shows how far we have come.

For those unfamiliar, the BDR is a small group of corporations that have each achieved at least $1 billion in spending with diverse suppliers. Johnson & Johnson earned this membership credential at year’s end in 2010, with $1065 MM total spending with minority and women-owned businesses.

As of July 28, we became the first healthcare company to join this group, joining member companies such as AT&T, IBM and Dell Inc. Our journey began in 2007, when we initiated a multi-year strategy to reach the billion dollar target. Business leaders across the enterprise fully endorsed this objective and within three years time, diverse spending with women- and minority-owned businesses increased by 40 percent.

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July 19th, 2011

Bridging Dreams

From Grace Gervacio, Human Resources and Contributions Director, Johnson & Johnson Philippines

In my role as Contributions Director for J&J Philippines, I have found that the sense of personal fulfillment seems to know no bounds.  But among all the meaningful engagements I have been privileged to experience, I have found no greater fulfillment than from seeing Aizel, Febe and Melanie, three students at a high school in our community in Paranaque, embark on a landmark journey towards a health care career.

These three young ladies are the first scholars of J&J Philippines’ Bridge to Employment (BTE) program.  BTE, a Johnson & Johnson program launched in 1992, provides mentoring to high school students to help prepare them for college and, ultimately, for future careers in the health care industry.   J&J Philippines was tapped to be the first site in Asia to launch this program.  In recognition of the socio-economic conditions in the country, a scholarship component was added to the local program.  Chosen among 20 students who went through the full set of activities such as internships and mentoring by J&J health care professionals, these youngsters will be going through a 2-year midwifery course before returning to Paranaque to serve the community as members of the City Health Office. 

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July 19th, 2011

Johnson & Johnson and “Our Global Giving”

Sharon D’Agostino, Vice President, Worldwide Corporate Contributions & Community Relations, visiting the AED Girls Education program that Johnson & Johnson supports in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

From Sharon D’Agostino, Vice President, Worldwide Corporate Contributions and Community Relations, Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson has a long tradition of Corporate Giving that is inspired by Our Credo responsibility to communities around the world.  Each year we publish “Our Global Giving,” an annual report that showcases the philanthropic work our Company does, working closely with our community-based partners.  The report also highlights the work of Johnson & Johnson colleagues who share the goal of making life-changing, long-term differences in human health. 

In 2010, we supported nearly 700 programs in more than 50 countries, and while these numbers underscore our commitment to local solutions for improving health, they do not capture the many, many personal stories of those who do this work and those who are touched by it.  I am fortunate and grateful to meet some of these people and am always deeply moved by these visits. 

“Our Global Giving” celebrates all of our partners, and though it is not possible to highlight the work of all programs, we have captured examples that provide a representation of the breadth of programs across our three focus areas — saving and improving the lives of women and children, building the skills of people who serve community health needs, and preventing disease and reducing stigma. 

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July 15th, 2011

The Evolution of Social Media: EVO 2011 Conference

From Susan Can, Director, Corporate Equity, Johnson & Johnson Global Marketing Group

On the weekend of July 7th, I had the pleasure of attending the EVO conference where Johnson & Johnson was one of the corporate sponsors.   Set in the scenic mountains of Park City, Utah, this was an amazing experience for us. We were able to meet and talk with so many people who are making a difference in the world by harnessing the power of the internet.

While many bloggers at the conference cover topics related to home, family and health, many also cover topics related to using social media for social good: using the power of the internet to champion specific causes to make a difference.  We were there to engage with attendees on this shared topic of interest – using, “Social Media for Social Good.” 

Visitors to the Johnson & Johnson suite were introduced to three varied aspects of what is happening in the world of social media and Johnson & Johnson.  We introduced &you™ (a brand new digital tool for social good – more on that below).  Participants were able to learn about specific causes that Johnson & Johnson supports, as well as given an opportunity to share their story on how they use social media for social good.

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