August 16th, 2011

Johnson & Johnson – A View on the Facebook Policy Change

There‘s been a good deal written on-line the last few days about changes to Facebook’s policy on commenting practices and how those changes are affecting pages associated with companies in the pharmaceutical industry. (See San Francisco Chronicle and Washington Post stories). 

 As you know, Johnson & Johnson is a widely decentralized business with more than 250 companies around the world in consumer health care products, medical devices and diagnostics, and pharmaceuticals.  We have at least 60 Facebook pages associated with our businesses and brands, and the vast majority of our pages were not impacted by the Facebook policy change because they already had commenting enabled. For example, our corporate page has always allowed commenting (https://www.facebook.com/jnj) and has a clear policy on how we manage our page and comments (see Info and Description).

 That being said, Facebook’s new policy has impacted a few group pages across our businesses, primarily a few unbranded pharmaceutical pages about certain disease states noted in the media.  In these cases, decisions to close communities were difficult, but necessary, and they were communicated to those pages’ followers.  The new policy altered functionality in ways that changed the ability to sponsor some pages due to regulatory, legal and other considerations.

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August 16th, 2011

Making an Impact With mothers2mothers at BlogHer

By Robin Smalley, Co-Founder/International Director of mothers2mothers International

“Mom it Forward”, “It Ain’t Easy Being Cheesy”, “Hey Whats for dinner Mom?”, “The Succulent Wife”, “The Curvy Fashionista.”  How could anyone not want to meet the moms behind these blogs?  Thanks to Johnson & Johnson, I had that opportunity on August 5th – 6th at the BlogHer Conference in San Diego.

What an experience it was!  A relative newcomer to the Blogosphere, I was invited by Johnson & Johnson as part of their effort to enlighten both experienced and novice bloggers to the power of social media for social good.  As a co-founder of mothers2mothers, a nonprofit organization that educates pregnant women living with HIV about how to keep themselves healthy and what steps they can take to have a healthy HIV-free baby, I was as passionate as my Johnson & Johnson partners to encourage the 3000 attendees to realize the global good they could accomplish amongst their hundreds of thousands of followers.

My story is simple.  mothers2mothers works to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in a simple and effective way.  We educate, employ, and empower mothers living with HIV to keep themselves and their children healthy.  “Mentor Mothers” — women living with HIV — work alongside doctors and nurses to offer critical information and support to other women.  

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August 15th, 2011

A Sustainability Project

From Jeff Silva, Sabu Mathew and Neha Thatte, Global Strategic Design, Johnson & Johnson

Sustainability has been a key priority of Johnson & Johnson for years. A few weeks ago, we launched our Healthy Future 2015 goals, which call for an increase in the sustainable design of the products from our operating companies. As employees of the Johnson & Johnson Global Strategic Design office.  We work with the businesses on packaging design, and we’ve learned important lessons about sustainable design over the years.

We wanted to take our enthusiasm for sustainable design and use it to inspire people to think about sustainability in a different way. This sustainability project was the end result – an effort to reuse excess materials that typically become waste while raising awareness about sustainability and helping people in low resource settings.

The project encourages people to educate themselves on waste and how they can reduce it, and it also focuses on the idea of eliminating waste.

Each of  the project’s initiatives is designed to not only touch on sustainability, but to also help educate Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies employees and community members on how they can be more sustainable. Each initiative also will have a positive social impact, by helping people in low resource settings.

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August 8th, 2011

Training Surgeons to Help Meet India’s Growing Health Care Needs

From A. Vaidheesh, Managing Director, Johnson & Johnson Medical India, a Division of Johnson & Johnson Ltd, India.

The other week, my colleagues Gary Fischetti and Michael del Prado joined me to open the DePuy Institute for Advanced Education and Research in Chennai in the southern part of India. DePuy, a Johnson & Johnson Company, is one of the world’s largest orthopaedic and neuroscience device companies. 

This new facility is the first of its kind outside the U.S. and it comes in response to a severe shortage in India of skilled surgeons to meet the country’s growing health care needs.

Knee arthritis is widely prevalent in India. This painful, degenerative condition can rob people of the simple things in life that so many of us take for granted – visiting family, going to work, walking up stairs.  Joint replacement surgery could be a good option for many of India’s five million knee arthritis sufferers, but only with the involvement of skilled surgeons.

Today, we estimate there are only about 1,600 well-trained joint surgeons in India.  If current health trends continue, we’ll need 4,500 joint surgeons within the next five years – or nearly three times as many as we have now.

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August 4th, 2011

Celebrating 125 Years

Yesterday, we commemorated the 125th anniversary of Johnson & Johnson with a celebration for employees at our World Headquarters in New Brunswick, New Jersey.  Many of our operating companies around the world are marking this milestone anniversary in a variety of ways, and some are also celebrating their own operating company anniversaries this year in conjunction with the Company’s 125th.

In 1886, three brothers – Robert Wood Johnson, James Wood Johnson and Edward Mead Johnson — founded Johnson & Johnson to meet a huge unmet need in healthcare and society:  the first large-scale mass produced sterile surgical dressings and sterile sutures  to make surgery sterile and save lives in hospitals.  Today, a century and a quarter later, the world is a much more high-tech place, with smart phones, social media and health care technology that would have been unimaginable to our founders.  And  today, that little startup that began in a four-story former wallpaper factory in New Brunswick s a worldwide organization with approximately 116,000 employees at more than 250 operating companies in 60 countries.  But one thing hasn’t changed in 125 years:  finding innovative ways to meet unmet needs for patients, consumers and the community across the world.

Here are a few photos from our employee celebration yesterday:

Chairman and CEO William C.

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August 1st, 2011

LATISM: Using Social Media for Social Good

From Rob Halper, Director, Video Communication

July 28, 2011

I’m in a small, impoverished village in Haiti, just over the border of the Dominican Republic. The heat is sweltering, and there’s no electricity or running water. Dozens of pregnant women, many of whom are in their teens and already mothers, are attending a free pre-natal health clinic staffed by volunteer doctors from the U.S., found via Facebook and Twitter. The women are advised to get regular checkups, though this is problematic as they are so isolated. The doctors perform a routine examination, and if they suspect any serious conditions they are referred to a hospital in the Dominican Republic, where they will be treated for free. One frequent condition is fistula, a serious medical complication that sometimes occurs in pregnancy, particularly in younger girls. In addition to advice, the doctors also dispense folic acid, and give out JOHNSON’S® Baby products. Dulce Soto, a medical officer from the Johnson & Johnson operating company in the Dominican Republic, and her colleague Josephine Abreu, have also volunteered their time, travelling over 4 hours to get to participate in the clinic. 

A mother and her child at one of the LATISM-sponsored clinics

This is part of a month long sustainable development project set up by Ana Roca Castro and her LATISM (Latinos in Social Media) organization.

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July 28th, 2011

Why Becoming A Member of the BDR Matters

From Ruben Taborda, Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer, Medical Devices & Diagnostics group, Johnson & Johnson

I am often asked to explain what drives our commitment to supplier diversity. My answer is usually the same—enhancing our supplier network supports job creation in our communities and connects us to the patients and doctors we serve. This simple response explains why we are so determined to become leaders in this space. Although there is no true end goal (we can always get better at what we do), I believe our recent membership into the Billion Dollar Roundtable (BDR) shows how far we have come.

For those unfamiliar, the BDR is a small group of corporations that have each achieved at least $1 billion in spending with diverse suppliers. Johnson & Johnson earned this membership credential at year’s end in 2010, with $1065 MM total spending with minority and women-owned businesses.

As of July 28, we became the first healthcare company to join this group, joining member companies such as AT&T, IBM and Dell Inc. Our journey began in 2007, when we initiated a multi-year strategy to reach the billion dollar target. Business leaders across the enterprise fully endorsed this objective and within three years time, diverse spending with women- and minority-owned businesses increased by 40 percent.

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July 27th, 2011

Beauty

From Michael Bzdak, Ph.D., Director, Johnson & Johnson Corporate Contributions

If you are in New Brunswick, N.J., this month and want to be inspired, don’t miss an exhibition of amazing photographs at the Zimmerli Art Museum. The photographs are the result of 14 photographers, just beginning their careers, traveling to 46 countries to document community-based programs supported by Johnson & Johnson. You will find beauty, happiness, healing and hope in the faces of children, women and men in communities large and small. You will discover the familiar and the not-so-familiar as you gain visual access to healthcare settings, orphanages and rural settlements where many are challenged but all are hopeful.

Since 2001, Johnson & Johnson has sponsored a fellowship program at the International Center for Photography (ICP) that offers emerging photographers the opportunity to document selected community-based programs supported by Johnson & Johnson in Asia, Africa, Europe, the US and the Latin America. Programs range from a burn treatment center in South Africa to disaster relief efforts in Asia. If you’re interested in reading more about the individual photographers, Art Daily has an article on its website.

This exhibition is one way to celebrate the 125th birthday of Johnson & Johnson, which shares its roots in New Brunswick with Rutgers University, as well as its global reach.

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July 19th, 2011

Bridging Dreams

From Grace Gervacio, Human Resources and Contributions Director, Johnson & Johnson Philippines

In my role as Contributions Director for J&J Philippines, I have found that the sense of personal fulfillment seems to know no bounds.  But among all the meaningful engagements I have been privileged to experience, I have found no greater fulfillment than from seeing Aizel, Febe and Melanie, three students at a high school in our community in Paranaque, embark on a landmark journey towards a health care career.

These three young ladies are the first scholars of J&J Philippines’ Bridge to Employment (BTE) program.  BTE, a Johnson & Johnson program launched in 1992, provides mentoring to high school students to help prepare them for college and, ultimately, for future careers in the health care industry.   J&J Philippines was tapped to be the first site in Asia to launch this program.  In recognition of the socio-economic conditions in the country, a scholarship component was added to the local program.  Chosen among 20 students who went through the full set of activities such as internships and mentoring by J&J health care professionals, these youngsters will be going through a 2-year midwifery course before returning to Paranaque to serve the community as members of the City Health Office. 

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July 19th, 2011

Johnson & Johnson and “Our Global Giving”

Sharon D’Agostino, Vice President, Worldwide Corporate Contributions & Community Relations, visiting the AED Girls Education program that Johnson & Johnson supports in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

From Sharon D’Agostino, Vice President, Worldwide Corporate Contributions and Community Relations, Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson has a long tradition of Corporate Giving that is inspired by Our Credo responsibility to communities around the world.  Each year we publish “Our Global Giving,” an annual report that showcases the philanthropic work our Company does, working closely with our community-based partners.  The report also highlights the work of Johnson & Johnson colleagues who share the goal of making life-changing, long-term differences in human health. 

In 2010, we supported nearly 700 programs in more than 50 countries, and while these numbers underscore our commitment to local solutions for improving health, they do not capture the many, many personal stories of those who do this work and those who are touched by it.  I am fortunate and grateful to meet some of these people and am always deeply moved by these visits. 

“Our Global Giving” celebrates all of our partners, and though it is not possible to highlight the work of all programs, we have captured examples that provide a representation of the breadth of programs across our three focus areas — saving and improving the lives of women and children, building the skills of people who serve community health needs, and preventing disease and reducing stigma. 

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