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September 25th, 2007

Sharing the Learning Curve

I have only been a part of Johnson & Johnson since the beginning of the year, and so I get questions from my friends and family all the time about what it is like now to be working at Johnson & Johnson, “the baby company.” This question is usually followed by a request for baby lotions, beauty products or Band-Aid Brand adhesive bandages.

It can be a steep learning curve coming into Johnson & Johnson and getting up to speed on its many businesses, but as I learn things I hope to share some of my observations with you. I want to provide a voice on JNJBTW that brings a bit of an “outsider’s” perspective.

Johnson & Johnson is no different than most companies in the fact it faces sizable business challenges every day. For example, as a health care company with a pharmaceuticals business, we have to deal with how to replace significant revenues from drugs that will be going off patent and how to handle unprecedented reimbursement challenges for drugs like erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (speaking of my learning curve…).

There is a healthy curiosity and a natural skepticism in the marketplace about how companies, including Johnson & Johnson, can overcome such challenges.

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December 19th, 2014

When It’s More Than Joint Pain

by Jack L. Groppel, Ph.D., FACSM, Co-Founder, Johnson & Johnson Human Performance Institute, Inc.

When most people think about the effects of osteoarthritis (OA) on their life, they think about how it impacts them physically – how they may not be able to walk long distances anymore, or sit on the ground to play with their grandchildren. But what many don’t consider is the effect OA also has on their emotional, mental and spiritual energy or the quality, focus and force of one’s energy.

I fought joint pain every day for almost three decades, and it took up much of my best energy and left me with little for my family and work. I used to run or play tennis every day. Due to my OA, my personal trainers consistently told me I should not be running, but cycling and swimming instead. But, you see (and here comes the flawed thinking), I was busy. It took too long to change my exercise routine, and I got bored. I loved the action I got from a tennis workout, or from a four-mile run.

Over time, the pain in my knees combined with my desire to push myself physically forced me to give up many of the things I loved.

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December 16th, 2014

Holiday Giving

by Sarah Colamarino, Vice President, Corporate Equity Programs, Johnson & Johnson

As a mother of now two older teenagers, I always struggled to find family activities that could make “giving back” part of our daily lives. I learned that it did not always take a grand gesture to make a difference. Sometimes it’s the simplest of acts that make the biggest difference – volunteering at a soup kitchen; buying a toy for a child in need; donating food to a local food bank. But these activities can sometimes be difficult to find, especially given the hectic pace of the holiday season.

As head of our Corporate Partnerships team, we have worked to identify a few simple activities working with organizations making a difference for children and families. These hopefully will make “giving back” simple yet part of your holiday season. Examples include:

  • Save the Children “Gifts of Joy” Catalog: Save the Children is proud to be the leading expert on children. By selecting a gift through this catalog, you are making a donation to Save the Children and can help give every child the best chance for success, both domestically and globally. Each gift in this catalog is representative of resources, services or support provided by Save the Children to a program area in which we work, and may change due to environmental, programmatic and economic considerations.

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December 15th, 2014

Health Care Sustainability Gets a Shot in the Arm

by Erol Odabasi, Director, MD&D Sustainability, Johnson & Johnson

Sustainable Purchasing among Hospitals is on the Rise

Health Care Sustainability

Vaccine season is in full swing and your local hospital is probably advertising free flu shots. But this fall something’s different. If your provider is like the 300 global health care professionals my company, Johnson & Johnson, and Harris Poll recently surveyed, chances are your hospital has ‘gone green.’

Sustainability in the health care space has been on the rise for some time, and, according to the new study, 54 percent of health care professionals across six countries (United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Brazil and Japan) now report their hospital already incorporates sustainability into its purchasing decisions. This means that, in addition to price, quality, and outcomes, a majority of health care purchasers are also evaluating products based on environmental criteria, and that they are looking for products that are more energy efficient, free of materials of concern like PVC (polyvinyl chloride), and have a lower environmental impact after use.

Health Care Sustainability

While this mindset has existed among select practitioners for years, the exciting news is that 80 percent of global respondents now expect their hospitals will consider sustainability when purchasing products within the next two years – a significant increase from the current 54 percent.

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December 11th, 2014

Johnson & Johnson and USAID Partner to Address the Global Health Threat of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

by Paul Stoffels, M.D., Chief Scientific Officer and Worldwide Chairman, Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson

Among my lifelong goals is to advance progress in new treatment options for patients living with the world’s most serious health threats. Antimicrobial resistance is responsible for many of them, especially in communities with limited resources and fragmented healthcare infrastructures. When resistance limits first- and second-line options, healthcare providers must opt for less desirable alternatives,1 which often lead to worsened patient outcomes.

Over many years of researching and learning, the complexities of infectious diseases have become clear to me. Despite the development of new treatments to address ever-expanding forms of antimicrobial resistance, the ability to scale up appropriate use of treatment regimens remains challenging.

According to the 2013 Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States report, approximately 250,000 antimicrobial infections each year require hospitalization, or are already affecting hospitalized patients, who also already have weakened immune systems.1 These infections should command our complete attention especially because the threat can reach us all – almost half of infections occur in people younger than 65, and more than 90 percent of deaths occur in people 65 and older.1

Given the hardships of combating antimicrobial resistance, we are proud to announce our pharmaceutical company, Janssen, has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) for a collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to help address the global health threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

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December 5th, 2014

World AIDS Day: Working to Ensure No One is Left Behind

by Joseph Leahy, Community Liaison Manager with Janssen Therapeutics, a Johnson & Johnson company

Editor’s note: World AIDS Day, which is Monday, Dec. 1, serves as a reminder that while significant progress has been made in the global battle against HIV/AIDS, there is still much more to be done and we must recommit to the goal of Getting to Zero. Johnson & Johnson, driven by our purpose of caring, remains committed to the prevention, detection, education and treatment of HIV/AIDS. This blog post is the third in a series intended to provide a glimpse of these efforts and some of the individuals leading them.  

I have been working in HIV for the greater part of three decades. Over this period, I have seen shifts in policy, advances in science, and starts and stops in action towards this disease. Every World AIDS Day, I take time to reflect upon the progress that has been made, and the work that remains to be done, both here in the U.S. and abroad, to better the lives of the millions of people living with HIV around the world.

There are over a million people living with HIV in the U.S. today. Less than 30 percent have reached their treatment goals.

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December 1st, 2014

World AIDS Day Reflection

By Dr. Perry Mohammed, M.D., Medical Director of the Janssen Global Access and Partnerships Program

Editor’s note: World AIDS Day, which is Monday, Dec. 1, serves as a reminder that while significant progress has been made in the global battle against HIV/AIDS, there is still much more to be done and we must recommit to the goal of Getting to Zero.  Johnson & Johnson, driven by our purpose of caring, remains committed to the prevention, detection, education and treatment of HIV/AIDS. This blog post is the second in a series intended to provide a glimpse of these efforts and some of the individuals leading them. 

World AIDS Day

Pictured: A Street in Port au Prince.

Today is World AIDS Day – a day of both reflection and action, of mourning and celebration. Today is a day when the global health community comes together to consider all that we have accomplished and the remaining challenges that need to be overcome in the fight against HIV. Having worked in HIV and infectious diseases for most of my medical career, this day is of special significance to me on both a professional and personal level.

This time last year, I was in Haiti as part of a cross-industry delegation to learn about the country’s specific needs in HIV, and what we at Johnson & Johnson could do to meet those needs.

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November 25th, 2014

The Fight Against Pediatric HIV and AIDS Goes On

By Karen Manson, Senior Director, Janssen Global Citizenship & Sustainability

Editor’s note: World AIDS Day, which is Monday, Dec. 1, serves as a reminder that while significant progress has been made in the global battle against HIV/AIDS, there is still much more to be done and we must recommit to the goal of Getting to Zero.  Johnson & Johnson, driven by our purpose of caring, remains committed to the prevention, detection, education and treatment of HIV/AIDS. This blog post is the first in a series intended to provide a glimpse of these efforts and some of the individuals leading them.  

Fight Against AIDS

When I attended my first International AIDS Conference in 2002, UNAIDS reported that fewer than 30,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa had benefited from antiretroviral drugs. Even treating one million people on the continent was unimaginable at that time.

Fast-forward 12 years to this year’s conference in Melbourne, Australia, where I learned nearly 14 million people living with HIV in low and middle-income countries are now being treated, according to the most recent UNAIDS report.

This is very promising news. However, not all the news is good. As we approach World AIDS Day we are reminded that there is more work to be done, especially for adolescents.

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November 19th, 2014

For the Children’s Future

by Joaquin Duato, Worldwide Chairman, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, and Sarah Colamarino, Vice President, Corporate Equity Programs, Johnson & Johnson

Duato-1

As parents, both of us agree that no investment is more important than our children’s future. Every child-no matter where he or she is born-should survive and thrive. Whether during the early moments of life or through their important developmental years, children around the world can have healthier, happier futures.

That’s why this evening was a special night for all of us at Johnson & Johnson. Our Chairman and CEO Alex Gorsky, plus senior company leadership, joined hundreds of supporters at the Save the Children Illumination Gala, where we made a significant announcement to inspire the survival and healthy development of children under 5, with a focus on newborns. Johnson & Johnson is committing a minimum of $10 million over three years to help expand resources, with a particular focus on “Helping Babies Breathe.” This commitment is a natural expansion of the partnership that Johnson & Johnson and Save the Children have enjoyed for more than 20 years.

Alex Gorsky

© AEFletcher 2014

While the first day of a baby’s life is always a joyous one, it also can be a precarious one.

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November 19th, 2014

Supporting World COPD Day

World COPD Day Infographic

Today, November 19th, Janssen proudly supports World Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD) Day, an annual event organized by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) to raise awareness and improve care for obstructive lung diseases.

COPD is a progressive lung disease that interferes with airflow, making it difficult to breathe. Emphysema and chronic bronchitis are terms often used to describe types of COPD. More than 64 million people worldwide are living with COPD, and while core symptoms include cough, phlegm, and shortness of breath it can be life threatening. In fact, the World Health Organization estimates that COPD will become the third-leading cause of death globally by 2030. This staggering statistic speaks volumes, especially considering that COPD is treatable, although not curable.

At Janssen, we have made great strides to deepen our understanding of patient needs and build a strong network of skilled scientists and experts with deep disease understanding, while seeking collaborative efforts to develop future treatments that are safe, effective and accessible for patients. With a portfolio of promising therapies, Janssen strives to go beyond the current standard of care to not only treat the core symptoms of disease, but one day stop disease progression or even prevent COPD.

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